Category Archives: Uncategorized

Food for Thought: Closing the Food Gap

The last three books in our food-themed book series will be non-fiction, but very different in tone and content: from serious to humorous to scholarly, all fascinating and well-researched.food-gap

This month we will read and discuss Closing the Food Gap: Resetting the Table in the Land of Plenty by visiting writer Mark Winne (who will read Wed. April 5 at 7:00 at St. John’s Episcopal Church). A review in Beacon Press notes

In Closing the Food Gap, food activist and journalist Mark Winne poses questions too often overlooked in our current conversations around food: What about those people who are not financially able to make conscientious choices about where and how to get food? And in a time of rising rates of both diabetes and obesity, what can we do to make healthier foods available for everyone?

… Using anecdotal evidence and a smart look at both local and national policies, Winne offers a realistic vision for getting locally produced, healthy food onto everyone’s table.

Haven’t read the book yet? No worries. Come join us. 5:00-6:00, Thurs. April 13 at Cultivate Co-op Cafe, 901  Elm St. (No potluck: the cafe will be open and serving.)

The evening will coincide with Lake to River Co-op’s Online Market pick-up night. The monthly gatherings are free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible.

Here are the rest of our monthly selections:

May 11: Immortal Milk: Adventures in Cheese by Eric LeMay
June 8: Salt: A World History by Mark Kulansky

Spring Workshop Enrollment Open!

Announcing our Spring 2017 Menu of Workshops!beautiful-you

Is there a road you didn’t travel? Thinking about writing the family story? Looking for advice on the nuts and bolts of editing prose? And who told you not to copy, anyway? Get your creative on in one of our spring workshops.

Visit our workshop page for more information and to register.

Storygami! Writer Visits Youngstown

Two first-rate poetry, fiction and non-fiction writers grace our stage Wednesday Jan. 4 at 7:00, at Purple Cat Productions, 220 W. Boardman St., downtown. If you took the summer class on writing in short forms, you know we’re in for a great evening.

Bring your work if you’re inspired to read at the open mic emceed by Lit Youngstown intern and YSU student Sarah Davis.

molly-fuller

Molly Fuller was a semifinalist for the Jeanne Leiby Memorial chapbook award from The Florida Review and a finalist for the Key West Literary Seminar’s emerging writer award. Her prose and poetry can be found in NANO Fiction, Union Station Magazine, Potomac, and 100 word story and her flash sequence “Hold Your Breath” is in the White Pine Press anthology, Nothing to Declare. She was also the co-winner of Lit Youngstown’s Storygami contest at the 2016 Summer Festival of the Arts in Youngstown. Fuller is a Teaching Fellow in the Literature program at Kent State University.

Robert Miltner’s collection of prose poetry, Hotel Utopia, won the Many Voices Project book prize from New Rivers Press. His collection of flash fiction, And Your Bird Can Sing, was published by Bottom Dog Books. Recent nonfiction can be found in DIAGRAM, The Los Angeles Review, Hawai’i Pacific Review, Pithead Chapel and Great Lakes Review. He teaches at Kent State University and in the NEOMFA.

robert-miltnerx

Food for Thought Book & Potluck: Yes, Chef

This month we will read and discuss Yes, Chef, by Marcus Samuelsson, who has had a fascinating life, by any measure. Born in Ethiopia, adopted and raised in Sweden, he is a New York City chef working with African-American food traditions. According to the New York Times:yes-chef

The universal rule of kitchen work, Marcus Samuelsson says in his crisp new memoir, “Yes, Chef,” goes as follows: “Stay invisible unless you’re going to shine.” That rule applies to writers too, especially to those who would write food memoirs. Because you like to put things in your mouth does not mean you have a story to tell.

Mr. Samuelsson, as it happens, possesses one of the great culinary stories of our time.

Haven’t read the book yet? No worries. Come join us. 6:00-7:00, Thurs. Dec. 8 at Cultivate Co-op Cafe, 901  Elm St.

The potluck is informal: bring something you made or a prepared food or drink. The evening will coincide with Lake to River Co-op’s Online Market pick-up night. The monthly gatherings are free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible.

Here are the rest of our monthly selections:

Jan. 12: Julie & Julia by Julie Powell
Cancelled Feb. 9: The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan
March 9: Prodigal Summer by Barbara Kingsolver
April 13: Closing the Food Gap by Mark Winne
May 11: Immortal Milk: Adventures in Cheese by Eric LeMay
June 8: Salt: A World History by Mark Kulansky

Food for Thought Book & Potluck: The Garden of the World

the-garden-of-the-world_web1This month we will read and discuss Lawrence Coates’ historical novel The Garden of the World. Lawrence, who teaches at Bowling Green State University, was our featured reader in October, and read the first chapter of this engaging novel.

The Garden of the World is the tale of a pioneering winemaking family headed by Paul Tourneau, a fiercely ambitious vintner determined to make the finest wine in California.  His plans are disrupted by a phylloxera epidemic at the beginning of the twentieth century, the trials of national Prohibition, and the bitter alienation of his older son.  Played out against the vividly depicted seasonal rhythms of a vineyard and winemaking, this is a moving saga of betrayal, loss, and the consequences of ambition.

Haven’t read the book yet? No worries. Come join us. 6:00-7:00, Thurs. Nov. 10 at Cultivate Co-op Cafe, 901  Elm St.

The potluck is informal: bring something you made or a prepared food or drink. The evening will coincide with Lake to River Co-op’s Online Market pick-up night.

The monthly gatherings are free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible.

Here are the rest of our monthly selections:

Dec. 8: Yes, Chef! A Memoir by Marcus Samuelsson
Jan. 12: Julie & Julia by Julie Powell
Cancelled Feb. 9: The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan
March 9: Prodigal Summer by Barbara Kingsolver
April 13: Closing the Food Gap by Mark Winne
May 11: Immortal Milk: Adventures in Cheese by Eric LeMay
June 8: Salt: A World History by Mark Kulansky

Literary Halloweeeeeennn!

Come down to the Soap Gallery to hear some readings that might keep you awake at night. We’ll have cookies & punch, and if you are inspired, wear your literary-themed costume, zombie to Zelda.

Christopher Lesko & Jay Newman read at the Soap Gallery, 117 S. Champion St., at 8:00 p.m.

christopher lesko

Christopher Lesko is the author of The Grlz Like Vodka, Long Live Crazy, That’s My Ghoul, The Electric Lunatic, and a handful of deranged short stories. Other creative outlets of his include fine art photography, video production, graphic design, and abstract painting. He lives in Canfield.

Jay Throne

 

Jay Newman is the notorious “Rust Belt Prince of Effing Darkness,” the poet who dabbles in all things dark, gloomy, morbid, and curious. He is a recent graduate of the Northeast Ohio Master of Fine Arts program where he earned his MFA in poetry. Recently, he has published poems in Dark Gothic Resurrected, Crab Fat, and Midwestern Gothic. He will be releasing his first book Dear Goth sometime in the near future. Jay is also a musician in the project Black Kangaroo and an amateur filmmaker. He currently resides in Youngstown, Ohio, where he teaches English at Eastern Gateway Community College.

Thank you, WYSU

wysu

Lit Youngstown is volunteering to answer phones for the WYSU pledge drive this Wednesday, Oct. 19, from 7:00 a.m. to noon. To make a pledge, call 330.941.1481 or visit WYSU.org.

From Lit Youngstown co-director Karen Schubert:

NPR is an organizing principle in my life.

It’s true—I set my alarm to go off during Morning Edition. When I’m feeling resistant to getting up, I give myself a two stories delay. I save cooking projects for the hours when my favorite shows are on the kitchen radio: The Splendid Table, The TED Radio Hour, Fresh Air, All Things Considered. Early Saturdays now start with my number one best show, On the Media.

I’m an avid reader and returned to college as a nontraditional student, staying for three degrees. Even so, I’ve learned more about the world from NPR than from any other source. Politics, to be sure, but also science, economics, history, the arts, culture, travel, music (classical, jazz, folk, pop, blues)… everything from ants to zambonis.

But politics—public radio is the best source, bar none. That’s why some NPR listeners identify themselves as conservatives, and some liberals. This election, we’ve learned about policy proposals, the horse race, the biographies, and so much more. I believe that I have to know things I’m not really interested in, to be an informed citizen, and NPR makes it un-painful to learn.

I found public radio when I was a young stay-at-home mom, starving for intellectual stimulation. We listened continuously as my kids grew up. One morning in Wisconsin, the guest on a talk show was Frances Hamerstrom, author of Walk When the Moon is Full. My daughter called in to tell Ms. Hamerstrom how much her book meant to us.

Even now, so many of the conversations I’m in begin with “I heard on NPR…” I have my radio dial set to WYSU, and when I drive to visit my now-grown daughter in Cuyahoga Falls, I switch to WKSU right after the Meander Reservoir. Today I arrived a bit tearful after a story about the uptick in organ donation resulting from the opioid epidemic.

As the co-director of Lit Youngstown, I am exceedingly grateful to WYSU for including our events on the Community Calendar, and for all of the literary arts programming, including first-rate interviews by National Humanities Medalist Terry Gross. Who can forget Terry’s interview with Maurice Sendak? How much more poignant, now that he’s gone.

No matter how broke I am, I always give something to my local public radio station. The service is valuable beyond measure, and  along with my modest donation I send my undying gratitude.

Meet Our New Interns

Samantha Ensminger

 

Samantha Ensminger is a junior at YSU, double-majoring in English and Italian and minoring in Professional and Technical Writing. This allowed her to recently study abroad in Italy to further her education and move towards her goal of working in the publishing industry. She is ecstatic to now be working as an intern for Lit Youngstown.

 

 

Lisa Ronquillo is a New Jersey native and graduate teaching assistant at YSU. Her concentrations are in rhetoric composition and professional and technical writing. She is the recipient of The Edna K. McDonald Cultural Awareness Award, The Leader of TomorroLisa Ronquillow Diversity Recognition Award, The Women’s Diversity Achievement Award and Who’s Who Among Student in American Universities and Colleges.  Lisa is an avid black coffee drinker and enjoys writing memoir and poetry; reading; running in Mill Creek Park; and advocating for human rights. She is a self-confirmed Doctor Who, videogame, and comic book geek and revels in learning new things. This semester, Lisa will be collaborating with Lit Youngstown on a project for the graduate Technical Communication course.

Northside Corn Roast

30 Mile Meal will host a Northside Corn Roast at the Lake to River Food Hub on Baldwin Street at Elm on September 17 from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Lake to River
Come on down for cooking demos and tastings, live music, a corn roast, and locally brewed beer. It will be fun for all ages with free pony rides and face painting for kids.

 

Lit Youngstown will be there with free picture books for children and a series of short  readings.

10 – Wake up with Wellness
11 – Healthy Cooking with Soul – Cooking Demo with Sophia Buggs of Lady Buggs Farm
11:50 Lit Youngstown reading: Karen Schubert
12 – 4 – Live Music / Corn Roast / Soul Food Tastings / Local Beer / Family Fun at the Market
FREE Pony Rides & Facepainting
12-2 Caterpillarhead
12:50 Lit Youngstown reading: Terry Shears
1:50 Lit Youngstown reading: Cherise Benton
2-4 Shoe Shine Boys
2:50 Lit Youngstown reading: Anthony Genovese
3:50 Lit Youngstown reading: Bill Koch

The Art of Healing

We welcome Jamie Marich and Johanna Slivinske to our September First Wednesday reading, September 7 @ 7:00, Suzie’s Dogs & Drafts, 34 N. Phelps St.  Free parking on the street and in the lot behind the Voinovich Building on the corner of Hazel & Commerce.

An open mic will follow, emceed by community organizer Deb Cunningham. Open mic readers are invited to read for 5 min.–their own work, or a writer’s they admire.

Jamie MarichA dancer, musician, performer, writer, clinical counselor, and registered expressive arts therapist, Jamie Marich unites these elements of her experience to achieve an ultimate mission: bringing the art and joy of healing to others. Her career in counseling and human services began while she worked in Bosnia-Hercegovina from 2000-2003. While in Bosnia, she served as an English and music teacher, in addition to working freelance for other humanitarian aid projects. Marich, currently working in private practice after obtaining many years of experience in inpatient mental health, inpatient chemical dependency, and outpatient dual diagnosis treatment, travels the country for several professional continuing education providers, offering instruction on a variety of clinical topics. She is the author of five books; her latest book is Dancing Mindfulness: A Creative Path to Healing and Transformation (SkylightPaths Publishing 2015). Johanna Slivinske

Johanna Slivinske is an author, therapist, adjunct instructor, and activist. She is co-author of the books Therapeutic Storytelling for Adolescents and Young Adults, published by Oxford University Press, and Storytelling and Other Activities for Children in Therapy, published by John Wiley and Sons. She has also authored a book chapter, professional journal articles, blogs, and poetry. In addition, she is Associate Editor for Review Quality for the journal Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping, published by Cleveland State University. In October, 2015, she was invited to the White House for the first ever Worker Voice Summit and in June, 2016, she attended the Women’s Worker Voice Summit at the United States Department of Labor in Washington, DC. She is a therapist at PsyCare and an Adjunct Instructor in the Department of Social Work at Youngstown State University, where she also serves as Affiliated Faculty for Women’s and Gender Studies.